Courses

Fall 2013 Courses for Academic Credit

Course schedules, classrooms, and times are to be determined.

ADR Clinic (2 hours)

Course #: 9504
Schedule of classes: F, 9:00 – 10:40 AM
Room: 204
Clinical Component:  Throughout the semester
Prerequisites:  Superior Court Mediation – Evening (8605), or Mediation (8600).
Instructor:  Kathleen Wallace

Alternative Dispute Resolution Clinic (ADR) encompasses processes available to disputants to address conflict outside of litigation. The ADR Clinic is an opportunity for students to learn about, observe, and participate in these various processes. The Clinic will equip students to function effectively in a spectrum of legal disputes and to apply theoretical frameworks in the context of real-world issues and complexities. This course consists of a classroom component that meets during the semester, and a practicum in which students mediate District court criminal cases, Medicaid appeals in the Office of Administrative Hearings, and participate in other ADR related processes and activities.

Note:  Students should go to the Dispute Resolution Institute TWEN page and read “What Students Need to Know About the ADR Clinic” before enrolling in the course.

Arbitration (2 or 3 credit hours)

Course #: 9505
Schedule of classes: W, 9:00 – 10:40 AM
Classroom component
Room: 204
Instructor: Mark Morris

Mediation (2 or 3 credit hours)

Course#: 8600
Schedule of classes: W, 5:00 – 6:40 PM
Room: 205
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: Kathleen Wallace

This course will focus on the theory and practice of mediation, including an in-depth look at transformative, facilitative, directive-evaluative, and narrative approaches to mediation. North Carolina’s court-annexed mediation programs, Dispute Resolution Commission rules, and Professional Standards for Mediators will also be featured.

Mediation Advocacy (2 credit hours)

Course#: 8016
Schedule of classes: T, 8:00 – 9:40 AM
Room: 204
Prerequisites: Negotiation
Instructor: Pamela Glean

This course will examine and develop the unique skill set necessary to operate as an effective advocate for parties in non-adversarial dispute resolution processes, particularly mediation. The course is taught using interactive role-plays and simulation exercises. Topics addressed will include selecting a mediator, preparing the case and the client for the process, developing problem-solving approaches, preparing mediation presentations, effective negotiation strategies and tactics, and drafting workable resolutions. The course will also prepare students to participate in the ABA Representation in Mediation Competition that takes place each spring semester.

Negotiation (2 or 3 credit hours)

Course#: 4600
Schedule of classes: F, 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (meets for 10 weeks)
Room: 205
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: Mark Morris

Negotiation theory and skills will be taught through a hands-on, interactive course that employs role-plays and simulation exercises. Although the theory and skills are of general application, this course emphasizes negotiating and settling litigated claims and the lawyer’s role as advocate within that setting. Students will also be prepared to participate in the ABA Negotiation Competition that takes place each fall semester.

Plea Bargaining (2 credit hours)

Course#: 9509
Schedule of classes:
Room: 205
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: G. Nicholas Herman

This course will examine plea bargaining in federal and state court, including ethical considerations in plea bargaining (ABA Standards on Criminal Justice and the NDAA standards), legal considerations in the prosecution’s charging decision, entering pleas and sentencing, along with plea bargaining and sentencing under the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines. The course will tie broader negotiation theory and problem-solving strategies to the practice of plea bargaining from both the prosecution and defense perspectives.

DRI Externship I (2 credit hours)

Course #: 9803
Schedule of classes:  See Instructor
Classroom component: See Instructor
Room: See Instructor
Clinical Component:  Throughout the semester
Instructor: Mark Morris

This course may be taken by any student. Students enrolled in the DRI Certificate Program will be given registration preference. The externship is conceived as a mechanism for linking students in meaningful ways to the practice of dispute resolution. The externship must contain a substantial dispute resolution component and provide significant opportunities for students to experience and learn practical dispute resolution applications and skills. Before registering for the course, the student must submit an application/proposal to the Director of the DRI, who has the authority to accept or deny the application. Students are responsible for proposing their own placement, though the DRI can sometimes make suggestions and provide ideas and introductions. Before completing the application, the student must have researched their proposed placement and talked in detail with someone within the organization about how the student’s externship will provide meaningful experience based learning opportunities. Credit for the course requires a minimum of 100 documented hours of work toward the externship and presentation of a final report (or weekly journal) that is reflective of the learning experience. Consult the Director of the Dispute Resolution Institute for more information. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

DRI Externship II (3 credit hours)

Course #: 9804
Schedule of classes: See instructor
Classroom component: See instructor
Room: See instructor
Clinical Component:  Throughout the semester
Instructor: Mark Morris

This course is required for students seeking the Advanced Certificate in Dispute Resolution. The requirements are the same as DRI Externship I, except that the student must submit a 30 page final paper of publishable quality, the preparation of which will be supervised by the Director. This course is graded.

Summer 2014 Courses for Academic Credit
(TBA)

 

ADR Clinic (2 hours)

Course #: 9504
Schedule of classes: M W F
Classroom component: TBA
Room:
Clinical Component: Clinical activities are scheduled from May 20 – August 1.
Prerequisites:  Superior Court Mediation – Evening (8605), or Mediation (8600).
Instructor:  Kathleen Wallace

Alternative Dispute Resolution Clinic (ADR) encompasses processes available to disputants to address conflict outside of litigation. The ADR Clinic is an opportunity for students to learn about, observe, and participate in these various processes. The Clinic will equip students to function effectively in a spectrum of legal disputes and to apply theoretical frameworks in the context of real-world issues and complexities. This course consists of a classroom component that meets during the semester, and a practicum in which students mediate District court criminal cases, Medicaid appeals in the Office of Administrative Hearings, and participate in other ADR related processes and activities.

Note:  Students should go to the Dispute Resolution Institute TWEN page and read “What Students Need to Know About the ADR Clinic” before enrolling in the course.

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ADR – Processes and Practices

Course#: 9503
Schedule of classes: TR ~ 3:15 – 6:00 PM
Room:
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: G. Nicholas Herman

A survey of the growing universe of alternatives to litigation, including conciliation, mediation, arbitration, hybrid forms, collaborative law, and private forms of adjudication. This course replaces the Alternative Dispute Resolution survey course.

(2 credit hours)

 

Theories of Conflict (2 Hours)

Course #: 8022
Schedule of classes: M W F Sa ~ July 8, 10, 15, and 17 ~ 5:00  – 8:45 PM, and July 13  &  20 ~ 9:00 AM – 1:15 PM.
Room: TBA
Prerequisite: None
Instructor: Jessica Jameson

The role of the lawyer is increasingly understood to require core competencies in problem-solving and managing conflict. Therefore, effective representation is enhanced by a deeper understanding of the sources and nature of conflict. This course will examine conflict from a variety of theoretical perspectives including biological, psychodynamic, communication, social systems, and management. Implications for conflict escalation, de-escalation, and conflict transformation will be addressed. Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Recognize a variety of causes of conflict and conflict escalation, leading to greater ability to alter nonproductive responses to conflict
  • Recognize types of conflict that are beneficial and detrimental to individual, group, and/or organizational outcomes, leading to ability to foster productive conflict
  • Recognize the advantages, disadvantages, and potential outcomes of a variety of conflict management strategies
  • Analyze the characteristics of a given conflict, improving the ability to select appropriate conflict management strategies for different situations
  • Respond more productively to conflict through effective dialogue and negotiation